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The Plug'n'Play Bill

basics
Industry: Retail & Distribution
Media:Cyber
Style: Minimalism
descriptioncnen
Synopsis
In Denmark men's sperm count has decreased by more than half in 40 years. Almost every tenth child is conceived by artificial insemination. Danish girls enter puberty one year earlier than just one generation ago. Scientists believe this is caused by hormone disrupting chemicals. Coop – the leading supermarket in Denmark - wanted to change this disturbing trend but found that new legislation was needed and the only ones who can change the law in Denmark are the 179 members of parliament. How could we make sure that the politicians pre-occupied with a lot of other important agendas took action? By doing all the hard work for them and make it hard for them not to do anything!
Strategy
Make it as easy as possible for the 179 members of the Danish parliament to pass a bill against hormone disrupting chemicals and make it as difficult as possible for them not to take any action.
Outcome
The campaign got hundred of thousands of Danes involved in the problem with hormone disrupting chemicals with an engagement rate 451% above the benchmark. Many of them shared their worries with the politicians through the campaign site. And the combination of people’s micro-lobbying, the 179 personalized e-mails, the 179 unique videos on Twitter and geo-targeted outdoor posters quickly and effectively gained the politicians' attention. So effectively that after a few months of people-driven lobbying, a new bill against hormone disrupting chemicals were passed in Denmark. Coop earned the title as Denmarks “Most Sustainable brand of the Year” according to Sustainable Brand Index. And with a letter from the Danish Minister for Environment and Food, thanking Coop for bringing the Plug’nPlay bill forward, we proved that sometimes it pays off to target the few, through many, to make a difference for every one of us.
Execution
On social media we started a debate among worried Danes around the problem of hormone disrupting chemicals. We encouraged people to put pressure on the politicians through micro-lobbying. Through a campaign site they could sign a petition and personalized e-mails were sent directly to the 179 members of parliament with a clear message – based on their particular political view on chemicals - that the law needed to be changed. To help amplify the peoples pressure on politicians, we also created 179 unique videos – one for each member - that were tagged on each every parliament members own Twitter account. And to ensure that no parliament member did not miss the important campaign message, we booked all outdoor posters in a one mile radius around the Parliament in two weeks.
CampaignDescription
The campaign idea was two-folded: Together with leading scientists and political experts we created the Plug’N’Play bill against hormone disrupting chemicals. A complete proposal for a bill that could be submitted straight to the parliament by any of its 179 members. The other part of the campaign was to direct the message to each parliament member in the most effective way. By targeting them directly with personalized and highly relevant content and mobilizing worried Danes to put pressure on each of them through micro-lobbying.
BriefWithProjectedOutcomes
Scientists believe that hormone disrupting chemicals is one of the biggest health challenges the world is facing today. Legislation is many years behind because of the continuous innovation of new chemicals every year. This was also the case in Denmark and the problem was not high on the political agenda. However only a few months after this campaign, the Danish parliament passed a bill against hormone disrupting chemicals and Denmark is now one of the leading countries in the world working to solve the problem and an inspiration to others.
credit
Brand:
Agency:
awards
Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity 2018
Shortlist Sustainable Development Goals
People > Good Health and Well-being
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Sponsor